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19001  Colonels of the 110TH Ohio  Salt Print 5” x 7” mounted to 8” x 10” of Gen. J
Warren  Keifer, Judge Foster (Lt Col William N. Foster) and Col. O. H. Binkley.  Gen.
Keifer was wounded twice at Winchester and severely at the Battle of the Wilderness and
a fourth time at Opequan.  $950  

Joseph Warren Keifer

Residence Springfield OH; a 26 year-old Lawyer.

Enlisted on 4/27/1861 as a Major.

On 4/27/1861 he was commissioned into Field & Staff OH 3rd Infantry
He was Mustered Out on 6/12/1861

On 6/12/1861 he was commissioned into Field & Staff OH 3rd Infantry
He was discharged for promotion on 9/30/1862

On 9/30/1862 he was commissioned into Field & Staff OH 110th Infantry
He was Mustered Out on 6/27/1865
(2nd Brgde, 3rd Div, 6th Corps)


He was listed as:
* Wounded 6/13/1863 Winchester, VA
* Wounded 6/14/1863 Winchester, VA
* Wounded 5/5/1864 Wilderness, VA (Severely wounded)
* Wounded 9/19/1864 Opequan, VA


Promotions:
* Lt Colonel 2/12/1862
* Colonel 9/30/1862 (As of 110th OH Inf)
* Brig-General 10/19/1864 by Brevet
* Major-Gen 4/9/1865 by Brevet
* Lt Colonel 10/18/1866 (26th RA Inf; Declined)


Other Information:
born 1/30/1836 in Bethel Twp, Clark Co., OH
Held GAR Offices:
* National Jr Vice-Commander from 1872 to 1873
* Dept of OH Commander from 1868 to 1870
died 4/22/1932 in Springfield, OH

(Major General in Spanish-American War.)

After the War he lived in Springfield, OH


Otho H. Binkley

Residence was not listed; 36 years old.

Enlisted on 9/1/1862 as a Major.

On 9/1/1862 he mustered into Field & Staff OH 110th Infantry
He was Mustered Out on 6/25/1865 at Washington, DC


Promotions:
* Lt Colonel 1/1/1864
* Colonel 10/19/1864 by Brevet

William N. Foster

Residence was not listed; 41 years old.

Enlisted on 9/13/1862 as a Lieut Colonel.

On 9/13/1862 he was commissioned into Field & Staff OH 110th Infantry
He Resigned on 12/24/1863


OHIO
ONE HUNDRED and TENTH INFANTRY
(Three Years)

   One Hundred and Tenth Infantry. - Col., J. Warren Keifer;
Lieut.Cols., William N. Foster, Otho H. Binkley; Majs., William
S.  McElwain, Aaron Spangler.  This regiment was organized at
Camp Piqua, Oct. 3, 1862, to serve for three years.  It moved
by railroad to Zanesville, thence by steamer to Marietta, and
from there by railroad to Parkersburg. W. Va.  It was engaged
in various duties in the Old Dominion until the spring of 1863,
when it participated in several small engagements in the vicin-
ity of Winchester.  It was at Brandy Station in November, where
it captured between 30 and 40 prisoners, and later four compa-
nies of the regiment, which had been detached as a train guard,
took a prominent part in the Mine Run campaign, losing 5 killed
and 20 wounded.  Occupying winter quarters at Brandy Station,
in May it crossed the Rapidan took a position on the extreme
right of the Federal line at the Wilderness, and in the first
day's fighting lost 19 killed, 88 wounded and 11 missing.  At
the close of the battle it moved through Chancellorsville to
the vicinity of Spottsylvania Court House and there engaged in
fortifying and skirmishing until May 14, when it marched toward
Spottsylvania, waded the Ny river after dark, and occupied the
enemy's works from which he had been driven.  It was engaged at
Cold Harbor, where in the assault on the Confederate works it
was in the front line, losing 5 killed and 34 wounded.  It was
at Petersburg in June and then was transported to Maryland in
time for the engagement at Monocacy, where it lost 4 killed, 74
wounded and 52 missing.  In August it was engaged in several
skirmishes in the vicinity of Cedar creek.  In September it
crossed the Opequan, and engaged in the battle of that name,
charging the enemy three times and being among the first to
occupy the heights at Winchester.  It then joined the pursuit
of the Confederates, engaging them at Fisher's hill, capturing
4 pieces of artillery and 100 prisoners.  On Oct. 19 it was en-
gaged at Cedar creek and in the final effort, which resulted in
the Confederate rout no regiment took a more active part than
the 110th Ohio.  It lost 5 killed, 29 wounded and 2 missing.
In the spring of 1865 it was at Petersburg and on March 25 par-
ticipated in the assault on the strongly entrenched picket line
of the Confederates.  On April 2 it again assisted in an as-
sault upon the enemy's works, which resulted in gaining posses-
sion of the fortifications and many prisoners and guns.  The
regiment pursued the enemy, routing him at Sailor's creek and
continued the pursuit until the surrender of Lee.  During its
term of service the regiment was in 21 engagements and sus-
tained a loss in killed, wounded and missing of 795 men.  It
was mustered out on June 25, 1865.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 2

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Report of Lieut. Col. Otho H. Binkley, One hundred
and tenth Ohio Infantry, of operations June 13-July 6.

HDQRS. 11OTH OHIO VOLUNTEERS, Camp in the Field,
September 7, 1864.
LIEUT.:+
June 13, we evacuated the works after dark, leaving a strong skirmish
line to cover the movement, and marched all night and most of the
following day; crossed the Chickahominy and halted for the night.
Marched at 4 o'clock on the morning of the 14th, passed Charles City
Court-House, and rested for the night. Marched a short distance on the
15th. On the 16th moved close to James River and threw up
breastworks, which we left in the evening. Marched to Wyanoke
Landing and embarked on board the U. S. transport steamer. We steamed
up James River, passed City Point just after dark, and landed at Point
of Rocks, on the Appomattox, where we remained until daylight, when
we marched about three miles and occupied fortifications at Bermuda
Hundred. About 1 o'clock in the night we moved out with the balance
of the brigade and formed for the purpose of assaulting the enemy's
works. The project was abandoned and we returned inside the
fortifications. On our way back the enemy's pickets, discovering the
movement, opened fire, but did us no harm. We left the fortifications
at Bermuda Hundred Sunday evening, 19th, crossed the Appomattox on a
pontoon bridge at Point of Rocks, arriving near Petersburg after dark
and remained for the night. On the 20th we remained quiet, the shells
from one of the enemy's forts passing along the front of our lines. On
the evening of the 21st we marched about six miles, crossing the
Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad. On the evening of the 22d we
charged the enemy's lines and drove them before us. In this charge we
had 4 men wounded. On the afternoon of the 23d we erected
breast-works, when we were ordered to the left to support the First
Brigade, their skirmishers having been driven back. After the firing had
ceased we moved back and occupied the position we had left the day
before. On the 24th threw up works a little farther to the front, and
went into camp. From the 24th to the 28th we remained inside of
works, except when on picket or guard duty. On the 29th marched about
six miles to Reams' Station, on Petersburg and Weldon Railroad, where
we remained all night tearing up the track. Two hundred of the One
hundred and tenth were sent on picket. On the evening of June 30
commenced our return, and after marching three miles halted and rested
for the night.

On July 1 remained quiet during the day and night, and on the morning
of the 2d returned to our old position near Petersburg and occupied the
works previously occupied by the Second Division, Sixth Army Corps.
On the 3d, 4th, and 5th remained quiet, and on the 6th day of July
marched to City Point, where we embarked on board the U. S. transport
City of Albany, for Baltimore, Md.*

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. H. BINKLEY,
Lieut.-Col. 110th Ohio Volunteers, Cmdg. Regt.

Lieut. JOHN A. GUMP,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.,  2d Brig., 3d Div., 6th Army Corps.


Source:  Official Records
PAGE 509-80   OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C.   [CHAP. LII.
[Series I. Vol. 40. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 80.]

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Reports of Lieut. Col. Otho H. Binkley, One hundred
and tenth Ohio Infantry, of operations September 19-22 and October 19.

HDQRS. 110TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS,
Camp in the Field, Va., September 27, 1864.
LIEUT.: In obedience to orders from headquarters Second
Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Army Corps, I have the honor to submit
the following report of the part taken by the One hundred and tenth
Regt. in the engagements of the Opequon and Fisher's Hill.

On the 19th of September, at 2 a. m., by command of Col. J.
Warren Keifer, commanding Second Brigade, the One hundred and tenth
Regiment, under my command, broke camp at Clifton, and, with the
balance of the brigade, marched toward Winchester. After crossing the
Opequon and arriving within two miles and a half of the latter place
lines of battle were formed, the One hundred and tenth being the
extreme right of the second line of the Second Brigade and connecting
on its left with the One Hundred and twenty-second Ohio Regt.
About two hours after we had formed the Nineteenth Corps came up and
formed on prolongation on our right. About 12 m. the order was given
to advance. We charged the enemy's lines, driving them back until, by
some means, the connection on our right was broken, and we, in turn,
were compelled to fall back a short distance. At this juncture the First
Division, which had been held in reserve, came up to our support. We
then, by direction of Col. Keifer, took a position under fire a little
farther to the left, when I threw out a strong skirmish line, under
command of Capt. Shellenberger, sufficient to cover the whole front
of the brigade. Skirmishing was kept up for about two hours, when we
were informed by Gen. Sheridan, who came the enemy's left. We
then charged with the balance of the line, completely routing the enemy.
My skirmishers passed through Winchester, driving the enemy before
them and then rejoined the regiment on Winchester Heights, with the
loss of only one man wounded. After dark we marched through
Winchester and rested for the night near the city. In this engagement
Capt.'s Van Eaton and Trimble and Lieut.'s Simes and Deeter were
severely wounded; the latter has since died of his wounds; also 7
enlisted men killed and 43 wounded.

On the morning of the 20th we resumed our march and arrived near
Strasburg, a distance of eighteen miles, in the afternoon, and found the
enemy in strong position on Fisher's Hill. In the afternoon of the 21st
the regiment, with the balance of the brigade, took a position about
three miles to the night of Strasburg and during the night threw up
breast-works. On the 22d, at about 12 m., the left wing of the
regiment, under command of Maj. Spangler, was placed on the
skirmish line. Skirmishing was kept up until about 2 o'clock, when the
line made a charge and took the hill in front, which they held until
evening, when a grand charge was made and the enemy driven at every
point. They ran in wild confusion, leaving everything behind them, and
were followed all night.

Both officers and men behaved well, some of them performing deeds of
valor seldom excelled. Lieut. Robert W. Wiley, of Company B,
acting aide-de-camp to the colonel commanding, with William Wise and
Elias A. Barr, of Company I, and O. A. Ashbrook, of Company I,
One hundred and twenty-sixth Ohio Volunteers, captured one captain
and twenty men at one time. The regiment captured four pieces of artillery.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. H. BINKLEY,
Lieut.-Col. 110th Ohio Volunteers.

Lieut. JOHN A. GUMP,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 2d Brig., 3d Div., 6th Army Corps.

-----


HDQRS. 110TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS,
Camp at Cedar Creek, Va., November 2, 1864.
CAPT.: In compliance with orders I have the honor to report the
following part taken by the One hundred and tenth Regt. in the
battle of Cedar Creek:

Just before daylight on the 19th of October firing was heard along our
picket-lines. By order of Col. Keifer, the One hundred and tenth
Regiment, with the balance of the brigade, was immediately put under
arms and awaited orders. In about an hour's time it was discovered that
the enemy had succeeded in turning the left of the Eighth Corps, having
taken it by surprise, and that the whole line, together with that of the
Nineteenth Corps, was rapidly giving way. The Sixth Corps was ordered
up to check the advancing foe, the Second Brigade forming the extreme
right of the brigade. We advanced to a stone wall, near corps
headquarters, where we were met by a severe fire from the front and
from the left flank. The destructiveness of the fire and the falling back
of the broken lines in our front caused us to ball back a short distance
and become temporarily detached from the brigade. The enemy
continued to advance and the regiment, with others, fell back slowly,
making frequent stands in order to check his advance as much as
possible, until we reached a point where a decisive stand could be made.
We continued to move back in this manner for about a mile, when we
rejoined the brigade and with it moved back to where the final stand was
made. At about 3 p. m. the One hundred and tenth Regt. and a
detachment of the Ohe hundred and thirty-eighth Pennsylvania
Regiment, under my command, were deployed as skirmishers and
advanced toward the edge of the woods, in which the Third Division
was then lying. About 5 o'clock I received orders to advancing at the
same time. After advancing about 400 yards the whole of both lines
halted. Rapid firing was kept up for some time, when we again
advanced across a corn-field, where the lines again halted and continued
firing until the enemy gave way along the whole line. The One hundred
and tenth, with the balance of the troops, followed the retreating and
demoralized foe until we reached our old camp from which we had been
driven in the morning.

In the operations of the day the regiment lost 5 enlisted men killed and
27 wounded.

During the early part of the engagement Capt. W. Devenney, while
nobly discharging his duty, fell mortally wounded. Capt.
Shellenberger was slightly wounded late in the day.

Both officers and men behaved with marked coolness and bravery during
the whole engagement. One of the enemy's battle-flags fell into
the hands of a member of Company K, but was afterward given up to
an officer of a New York regiment in the Nineteenth Corps who claimed
to have the first to it.

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. H. BINKLEY,
Lieut.-Col. 110th Ohio Volunteers, Comdg. Regt.

Capt. J. J. BRADSHAG,
Act. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 2d Brig., 3d Div., 6th Army Corps.


Source:  Official Records
PAGE 258-90   OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.   [CHAP. LV.
[Series I. Vol. 43. Part I, Reports, Correspondence, Etc. Serial No. 90.]

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Report of Bvt. Col. Otho H. Binkley, One hundred
and tenth Ohio Infantry, of operations March 25.

HDQRS. 110TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS,
April 16, 1865.
CAPT.: In compliance with orders I have the honor to make the following
report of the part taken by the One hundred and tenth Ohio Volunteer
Infantry in the attack upon the enemy's picket-line, March 25, 1865:

On the 25th, at about 1 p.m., the picket-line in front of the Second
Brigade, under the direction of Lieut.-Col. Damon, of the Tenth
Vermont Volunteers, received orders to attack and carry the rebel
picket-line in front. The One hundred and tenth and One hundred and
twenty-second Ohio Regiments, under my command, were sent out as
a support, with instructions that if the picket-line failed to take that of
the enemy the two regiments should advance and take it. When the
order was given for the picket-line to advance, only a portion of it went
forward, and the line was not taken. I then ordered the two regiments
forward on the double-quick with bayonets fixed, and would have
carried the enemy's line, which was strongly fortified, but when we had
gotten within about 150 yards of the works the shortness of our line
exposed us to a severe flank fire, and we were compelled to fall back
a few rods to a line of rifle-pits. Other troops of the brigade were then
sent out by Gen. Keifer and formed on our right and left, making the
line much longer, which had the effect to draw the fire from our flanks.
Another charge was then made under a destructive fire, and the enemy's
lines taken, with nearly all their pickets, most of whom threw down
their arms and surrendered. The One hundred and tenth Regt. in the
assault had 4 enlisted men killed and 16 wounded.

Brevet Lieut.-Col. Spangler was severely wounded through the thigh.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. H. BINKLEY,
Brevet Col. 110th Ohio Volunteers, Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. WILLIAM L. SHAW,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 2d Brig., 3d Div., Sixth Army Corps.


Source:  Official Records
CHAP. LVIII.]   THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.   PAGE 312-95
[Series I. Vol. 46. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 95.]

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Reports of Bvt. Col. Otho H. Binkley, One hundred and tenth Ohio Infantry.

HDQRS. 110TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS,
April 10, 1865.
CAPT.: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to make the
following report of the part taken by the One hundred and tenth Ohio
Volunteers in the assault of Sunday, April 2, 1865, upon the enemy's
works in front of Petersburg, Va.

The One hundred and tenth Regt. formed the right of the front line,
connecting on its left with the Sixth Maryland Regt. The regiment
was commanded by Capt. William D. Shellenberger, I being in
charge of the picket-line as corps officer of the day. When the signal for
the advance was fired from Fort Fisher the regiment moved forward
with the balance of the line, and was one of the first to plant its colors
upon the enemy's works. Before reaching the enemy's works Capt.
Shellenberger was severely wounded in the left arm and was compelled
to retire from the field. Capt. Elem Harter was also severely
wounded in the arm. Capt. H. H. Stevens was shot dead after he had
gotten inside of the enemy's works and was in the act of charging a
battery. Four pieces of artillery were captured by members of the
regiment, 400 prisoners, and two flags. The flags were captured by
Private Isaac James, Company H, and Sergt. Francis M. McMillen,
Company C; the latter also captured one piece of artillery.

Capt. George P. Boyer made himself conspicuous by his activity and
bravery. Adjt. William H. Harry, Lieuts. John T. Sherer, A. A.
Hubbard, D. S. French, and Amos Shaul deserve great credit for the
manner in which they conducted themselves during the engagement.
First Sergt. John W. Hays, commanding Company A, and Sergt.
Richard Pearson, commanding Company G, are entitled to mention for
their good conduct during the assault, in which the latter was severely
wounded. Sergt. Thomas Goe, Company D, in charge of three men,
caused 130 rebels to surrender to him; among those were 3 captains and
4 lieutenants. Corpl. Keeran McKenny, Company C, was the first to
reach and capture a four-gun battery. Corpl. Calvin M.
Espy, in a hand-to-hand combat, overpowered two rebels who refused
to surrender to him. A great many others performed deeds of a similar
character, but to mention all would occupy too much space.

The regiment in the assault had 1 commissioned officer killed and 2
wounded, 3 enlisted men killed and 22 wounded; total, 28.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. H. BINKLEY,
Brevet Col. 110th Ohio Volunteers, Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. W. L. SHAW,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 2d Brig., 3d Div., 6th Army Corps.

-----


HDQRS. 110TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS,
April 15, 1865.
CAPT.: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to make the
following report of the operations of the One hundred and tenth Ohio
Volunteer Infantry from April 3, 1865:

After the assault upon the enemy's works in front of Petersburg, Va.,
April 2, 1865, in which the One hundred and tenth Regt. took a
prominent part, and of which I made mention in a former report, the
regiment joined in the pursuit of the enemy, but did not become engaged
with him until the 6th, when, near Little Sailor's Creek, we met the
enemy in force. Lines were immediately formed, the One hundred and
tenth Regt. constituting the right of the first line, Companies A and
F being deployed as skirmishers to the right. We advanced through a
narrow strip of woods, where we were met by a severe fire of shell and
grape, with musketry, which caused a temporary halt; but we again
advanced, still exposed to the fire of grape and canister, driving the
enemy before us across a large, open field, compelling the enemy's
artillery to leave its position, and capturing a number of wagons, with
some ammunition. Had the men been fresh, instead of being fatigued from
the day's march, I have no doubt we could have taken the enemy's battery.

In this charge the regiment was more fortunate than usual, having only
one man wounded.

The regiment was, with its brigade, in pursuit of the rebel army at the
time it was surrendered by the rebel general, Robert E. Lee.

The regiment then marched, with balance of the troops, to its present
position.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. H. BINKLEY,
Brevet Col. 110th Ohio Volunteers, Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. W. L. SHAW,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 2d Brig., 3d Div., 6th Army Corps.


Source:  Official Records
 PAGE 1003-95   N. AND SE. VA., N. C., W. VA., MD., AND PA.   [CHAP. LVIII.
[Series I. Vol. 46. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 95.]